POSTED ON Friday, 06.12.2015 / 11:02 AM ET

The Rangers Youth Hockey Camp kicks off in a little over a month and youth hockey players from all over the world will be in attendance! Yes, in addition to kids from the tri-state area, we will also be joined by youth players from across the U.S.A as well as from Germany, Sweden, China, Austria, Mexico, Spain, France, and Finland! From the moment the campers arrive on their first day, they will experience top-level training from the hockey development staff that will not only help them develop skills on the ice, but also help build leadership and teamwork skills that will translate off the ice too. Susan Moley, who has had two children attend camp said, “Both my son and daughter have attended the New York Ranger camp the last two summers. They loved it so much, it is the only camp the repeatedly ask to go to again and again. They said it was the experience of a lifetime!”

Here is what your youth hockey player can expect to experience during their week at the New York Rangers Youth Hockey Camp.

Campers and parents will arrive Monday AM for check-in and orientation. Here campers will be divided into their respective age groups, and you will meet the coaches and staff that will be working with the players all week long. During this time, parents are encouraged to ask questions and be engaged. Campers can get excited about the week ahead!

Once orientation is complete, parents will depart and campers will dive in head first to the weeks activities. Each group is guaranteed a minimum of two hours of on ice training each day at summer camp. The ice times are usually broken up to twice a day. On the ice, kids will be divided up by skill level and will go through stick and puck handling drills, skating skill challenges, and scrimmages to help develop their talent to its highest potential.

Campers will receive off-ice training as well in multiple forms. Campers will gather daily in Kumon’s Classroom and be educated on everything from age appropriate fitness activities, nutrition, leadership skills, and the importance of rest. In addition to Kumon’s Classroom, campers will also have other off-ice training and activities.

Recreational time is provided to each group on a daily basis. During recreational time, campers will go through multiple team building activities that have an emphasis on trust. In addition to trust activities, campers will play other sports such as wiffle-ball to encourage multi-sport participation and provide fun activities that encourage physical fitness. Hockey focused off-ice training will also be provided on a daily basis. Campers will go through dry land skill training as well as strength and conditioning exercises.

In addition to the daily activities that campers will experience, each week a current New York Ranger player and multiple Rangers Alumni will stop by to help campers train both on and off the ice. On these days, campers will get to interact with the players and alumni in a small group setting and each child will have the opportunity to receive an autograph. New York Rangers legend, Adam Graves, has been appearing at camp each year since it began. He says of the program, “The New York Ranger summer camp is a wonderful opportunity for young hockey players to learn about the game of hockey in a fun, & memorable way! Reinforcing the importance of sportsmanship, preparation, teamwork, and respect!”

Towards the end of the final day of camp, parents are invited back to the MSG Training Center to watch the scrimmages amongst the groups and for the awards ceremony. Here, campers are given photos of their group and a certificate of achievement to commemorate all their hard work during the week. In addition, awards are also given out for leadership qualities and for hard work. No matter the case, one thing that can always be expected throughout the week is that the campers who attend create memories and friendships that last a lifetime.

Click Here to learn more about the New York Rangers Youth Hockey Camp and to register your child.

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POSTED ON Monday, 06.8.2015 / 12:08 PM ET

Contributed by USA Hockey

Even NHL players and Olympians need to take extended time away from the ice in the summer. It’s an essential component of their recovery, development and maintenance of high-level play. For children, that time away from hockey is even more important. Year-round hockey programming harms young skaters emotionally, physically and athletically, yet, many parents and coaches claim that early specialization is necessary to become an elite hockey player. It’s simply not true. USA Hockey, the United States Olympic Committee, countless high-level coaches and numerous physiologists will tell you that early specialization actually limits and damages prospective hockey players, reducing their chances of becoming the cream of the crop.

So what exactly is early specialization? It’s when a player, prior to puberty, focuses all of his or her time on one sport in hopes of increasing or accelerating skill development. It may sound like a logical route to more skill development, but research and anecdotal evidence indicates the contrary.

Young kids have short attention spans that limit the amount of time they can focus and perform repetitions correctly. Participating in multiple sports allows these young athletes to learn a variety of motor skills, hone them efficiently and increase their physical literacy. It teaches them diverse movement patterns, varied skill sets and cognitive understanding of game sense. Taking a long-term holistic view, it also puts them on a path toward a lifetime of real-world physical fitness, because they’ve developed the ability, confidence and habits to be competent in multiple physical activities. For the 99 percent of youth athletes that don’t become professional athletes, this varied fitness foundation helps them enjoy the camaraderie and health benefits of an active lifestyle in adulthood.

Another benefit of playing multiple sports is a reduction in overuse injury risk. Sports medicine doctors are seeing a substantial increase in overuse injuries among children and early specialization is a major contributor. These players are getting injured before they even have a chance to develop physically. Calls for change are coming from the hockey world and all over the sporting community.

Early specialization is also increasing the psychological burnout rate among children, eliminating many from the game before they even hit their athletic prime. Among those who hang on despite the burnout, there’s an indifference to their game that caps potential.

Adults get caught up in allowing or pushing their little ones to play one sport for a number of reasons. They might be scared that their child will fall behind. They might push them simply because the kids are good at it and see immediate skill improvements and love the results. However, athletic development is a long process, and sport-specific skill development is only one piece. In order to be a great player, one must be an athlete first. And it’s important to remember that, especially in hockey, the “great” 10U player won’t automatically be the “great” player in years to come, when it actually matters and the stakes are higher. Skills and sense transfer from sport to sport. Overall athleticism matters. Hunger matters. Energy matters. Recovery matters. Early specialization impairs all of this, limiting athletes’ potential for long-term success. The goal should not be to produce the best 10-year-old, but to cultivate healthy children instead, and give them an opportunity to thrive in high school athletics, college athletics and beyond. It’s hard to trust it as a parent, when those around you seem to be submitting to early specialization, but take heart in the following:

The U.S. Olympic Committee recently published a report based on a survey distributed to nearly 2,000 Olympic athletes. The results indicated that the vast majority of Olympians did not specialize in their sport until very late in their development, and even then, some continued to participate in other sports.


Average number of sports played among Olympians (by age)

Age

Average Number of Sports Played

10-and-under

3.11

10-14

2.99

15-18

2.2

19-22

1.27

22-and-older

1.31

These findings indicate that Olympians were involved in an average of three sports per year until age 14, which contradicts the notion that early specialization is critical to long-term athletic success. Multi-sport play appeared to be beneficial to these Olympians.

Bottom line, mounting evidence shows no benefit to young athletes specializing in a single sport. Even more alarming, they have a greater risk of repetitive-use injury, they experience more burnout and they miss out on the advantages that playing multiple sports can give them.
So, encourage your kids to try different sports and to have fun while they are doing it.

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POSTED ON Monday, 06.8.2015 / 8:20 AM ET

  1. His youth hockey idol growing up was Mats Sundin.
  2. Click to find out what it was like the first time he went skating...


  3. Click to find out what skill he has had to work the hardest at to perfect…


  4. Click to find out what Nash would be if he was not a professional hockey player…


  5. Click to find out what made Nash first want to play hockey..

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POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.14.2015 / 8:00 AM ET

  1. His youth hockey idols growing up were Peter Forsberg and Joe Sakic.
  2. His favorite pre-game meal is pasta.
  3. Click to find out what made Mats first want to play hockey…

  4. Click to find out what Mats would be if he was not a professional hockey player…

  5. Click to find out what skill he has had to work the hardest at to perfect…

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POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.14.2015 / 8:00 AM ET


The New York Rangers and Garden of Dreams provided kids who participate in the Power Players introductory street hockey program with the chance to learn to play ice hockey at the Madison Square Garden Training Center. The Garden of Dreams Foundation provides the Power Players street hockey program to four charity partners each season. Children from the Children’s Aid Society, Harlem Dowling, Police Athletic League NYC, and WHEDco are provided with weekly scheduled clinics from November to January that aim to educate and inspire 100 new players and 100 returning players, known as Selects, each year.

On March 30, as a final component of this season’s program, the Selects had the opportunity to try ice hockey for the first time at the MSG Training Center. Rangers alumni Dan Blackburn and Darren Turcotte were on hand to offer instruction, sign autographs and take photos with the children. In addition, representatives from Ice Hockey in Harlem were on hand to talk to the kids who have expressed interest in continuing to develop their hockey skills beyond the Power Players Program. Rangers alum, Darren Turcotte, stated,“Hopefully they continue playing in the future, and this helps grow the game.”

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POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.14.2015 / 8:00 AM ET

The New York Rangers in partnership with Coca-Cola “Get The Ball Rolling” celebrated the conclusion of the 5th season of the Rangers Street Hockey program on Saturday, April 4th. Over the course of the season, partner organizations, NYC Parks, Boys & Girls Clubs, and the Police Athletic League NYC host on- going street hockey clinics for over 3000 local youth. The season culminates with a tournament and celebration held at the Intrepid Museum.

Over 300 participant joined NY Rangers alumni Brian Mullen, Tom Laidlaw, and Ed Hospodar for a day of street hockey, skills challenges, and other interactive activities. Despite the wind, the kids were in high spirits throughout the entire event. Josh Gold, the Director of Communications for Coca-Cola Co. stated, “The program is a great opportunity to introduce kids to street hockey, get them active, and have fun!” At the end of the day, each participant was awarded with a medal to recognize their hard work throughout the season.

Click here for more information on the NY Rangers street hockey clinic.

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POSTED ON Monday, 03.9.2015 / 8:00 AM ET


1) The first hockey team he played for was the NorWest Stars (Ontario)

2) His superstition is that he must eat a peanut butter & jelly sandwich on game days.

3) Click Here to find out what Marc’s first time on the ice was like.


4) Click Here to find out what hockey skill Marc has had to work the hardest at to perfect.


5) Click Here to find out why Marc first wanted to learn to play hockey.


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POSTED ON Monday, 03.9.2015 / 8:00 AM ET

The New York Rangers hosted their annual Casino Night fundraiser on Thursday, March 5th and proceeds from the event go to the Garden of Dreams Foundation. A new benefit this year is that those who were unable to attend have the option to bid on exclusive experiences and prizes. The silent auction is now available online and Blueshirts fans can place their bids until Thursday, March 12th at 5:00pm for the chance to win.

Prizes this year range from autographed items to exclusive experiences such as a goaltending lesson with NY Rangers goalie coach Benoit Allaire for players ages 8 to 16. Also available are a team skating clinic with coaches Scott Arniel, Ulf Samuelsson, and Darryl Williams at the MSG training center for players ages 8 to 16. Also available are stick kid experiences and zamboni rides for kids ages 6 to 13 years old. Click here to place your bid and see a full list of available prizes.

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POSTED ON Monday, 03.9.2015 / 8:00 AM ET


The New York Rangers have officially launched registration for their youth hockey summer camp. The camp will host four separate sessions, each one week long through the month of July. The session dates are, July 7-11, July 14-18, July 21-25, and July 28- August 1. The camp is held at the Madison Square Garden Training Center in Tarrytown, NY and features both on and off ice elements and training. In addition, each session will feature an appearance from a Rangers alumni. Click here For more information about the New York Rangers Youth Hockey Summer Camp or to register your child to attend.

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POSTED ON Monday, 03.9.2015 / 8:00 AM ET

The New York Rangers hosted the 4th annual Hockey Weekend in NY from February 19th – 22nd and featured alumni appearances and events across the tri-state area. The weekend kicked off on Thursday the 19th with a cross-ice jamboree at Madison Square Garden for youth hockey players. Over 100 kids ages 10 and under took to The Garden ice for two hours before the game that evening. Joining them on the ice were alumni Brian Mullen, Glenn Anderson, and Adam Graves. Rangers alum Glenn Anderson stated, “It is just great to see this especially at Madison Square Garden, the kids are just having a blast.”
 
On Saturday, over 3,000 fans took the ice at 11 rinks across the tri-state area for free public skating sessions. Each rink featured a NY Rangers alumni who participated in the public skate and signed autographs for participants. Wollman Rink in Central Park was the marquee event and hosted 4 Try Hockey For Free sessions in addition to offering 4 hours of public skating throughout the afternoon. As the snow started to fall, fans did not shy away from joining Rangers greats, Adam Graves, Rod Gilbert, Eddie Giacomin, Eddie Johnstone, and Ron Duguay on the ice.
 
Hockey Weekend in NY finished the celebration with Youth Hockey Night at Madison Square Garden when the NY Rangers played the Columbus Blue Jackets. The night was a celebration of all things youth hockey and featured in game elements such as 6 youth hockey players lining up on the blueline with the NY Rangers starters for the national anthem, a Little Rangers game during the 1st intermission, the Emile Francis Award ceremony, and concourse activations such as face painting and a “Make Your Own Hockey Card” station. Adam Graves said, “Hockey Weekend in New York is something we look forward to every year. Everyone is out here having a great time, and this is in essence what the game is all about.”

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