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Post-hockey life keeps Richter in New York

Former Rangers goaltender embracing new career challenges

Tuesday, 05.26.2009 / 2:24 PM / 15th Anniversary of 1994
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Post-hockey life keeps Richter in New York
By Chris Creed, newyorkrangers.com

If you find yourself queued up in the Main Concourse of Grand Central Station waiting to board the 6:18 p.m. train to Mamaroneck, keep your eyes peeled because you may just get a glimpse of one of the greatest goaltenders to ever strap on the pads for the New York Rangers.

Rangers great Mike Richter acknowledges the crowd during Adam Graves Night on Feb. 3 at MSG. Five years earlier, Richter became the first of four members of the 1994 Stanley Cup champion Blueshirts to have his number retired.
That’s right; Rangers great Mike Richter is a working man, having to battle the daily commute to and from Manhattan each day. But Richter is fighting the good fight as a partner at Environmental Capital Partners. ECP is a private equity firm that invests in environmentally conscious companies. The firm is financed by former New York Islanders owner Howard Milstein.

“I find it to be an incredible way of life right now,” said Richter, who backstopped the Rangers to the 1994 Stanley Cup championship.  “It’s a huge learning curve, a different way of life.  You have to just respect that there’s very great people there and you have a lot to learn but I’m with great people.”

Richter’s mission of improving the environment dates back to his days at Yale University where he earned a degree in Ethics, Politics and Economics with a concentration in Environmental Policy.  And despite his hectic schedule, he continues to sit on a number of non-profit boards and last year took part in New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Million Trees NYC initiative.

“I care deeply about environmental issues so I’ve been really focusing on that for some time,” he stated

That passion for effecting change almost sparked a run for Congress in 2008.  Richter’s name was being mentioned as possible candidate for the Fairfield County (Connecticut) seat last year.  In the end, Richter determined the time was not right for a political career but left the door open for a possible run for Washington in the future.

That passion for effecting change almost sparked a run for Congress in 2008.  Richter’s name was being mentioned as possible candidate for the Fairfield County (Connecticut) seat last year.  In the end, Richter determined the time was not right for a political career but left the door open for a possible run for Washington in the future.

“You’re in such a good position as a pro athlete to offer a lot to the public,” said Richter, who entered the United States Hockey Hall of Fame in 2008 with former teammate Brian Leetch.  “Public service is a way of giving back whether it’s as an elected official, governor or any way.”

In addition to his involvement with environmental issues, Richter has stayed busy since retiring from game in 2003. He remained active with his alma mater, serving as a volunteer coach for the Yale ice hockey program, and has competed in both an Ironman Triathlon and the New York City Marathon.

“You have a lot of time on your hands,” Richter said of retirement.  “You’re looking for challenges to fill the void of no longer playing.

“The life I led as a professional athlete was phenomenal. I wouldn’t have traded it for anything. I’m at a different place in my life right now and you take advantage of the things that are available to you.  And there’s no better place to do that than in New York.”